EthiCS: Unicode

Character representation

Coding systems

Chappe semaphore, 1790s

Chappe semaphore

Reference

Braille alphabet, 1820s

Braille

Reference - Image reference

Japanese Braille, 1880s

Japanese braille

Reference - Image reference

Efficiency vs. representation

Telegraphy, 1930s

CCITT #2

Reference

BCDIC, 1930s

BCDIC

Reference

ASCII, 1960s

ASCII

Reference

MORE THAN 64 CHARACTERS!

MORE THAN 64 CHARACTERS!

Reference

America and the world

à â ç É é ê è î ô ù û £ ° § ¨
French (ISO-IR-025) @ N/A \ N/A { N/A } N/A N/A | N/A # [ ] ~
Canadian French #1 (ISO-IR-121) @ [ \ N/A { ] } ^ ` | ~ N/A N/A N/A N/A
Canadian French #2 (ISO-IR-122) @ [ \ ^ { ] } N/A ` | ~ N/A N/A N/A N/A

C

{ a[i] = '\n'; }

C?

ä aÄiÜ = n'; ü

…C?

??< a??(i??) = '??/n'; ??>

What about that bit 7?

MORE THAN 128 CHARACTERS!

ISO 8859-1

Reference

ISO 8859

Ísland sigurinn

The panda in the room

Unicode: the dream

Unicode 1

Intense technical and social arguments

1

Have these people no shame?

This is what happens when a computing tradition that has never been able to move off ground-zero in associating 1 character to 1 glyph keeps grinding through the endless lists of variants, mistakes, rare, obsolete, nonce, idiosyncratic, and novel ideographs available through the millenia in East Asia.

2

I did not attend the meetings in which ISO 10646 was slowly turned into a de facto American industrial standard. I have read that the first person to broach the subject of "unifying" Chinese characters was a Canadian with links to the Unicode project. I have also read that the people looking out for Japan's interests are from a software house that produces word processors, Justsystem Corp. Most shockingly, I have read that the unification of Chinese characters is being conducted on the basis of the Chinese characters used in China, and that the organization pushing this project forward is a private company, not representatives of the Chinese government. … However, basic logic dictates that China should not be setting character standards for Japan, nor should Japan be setting character standards for China. Each country and/or region should have the right to set its own standard, and that standard should be drawn up by a non-commercial entity.

Unicode 2

UTF-16

A more perfect encoding

UTF-8

Advantages of UTF-8

How can we tell UTF-8 is good?

Use of UTF-8 over time on the Web

Reference

Emoji

Emoji history

Emoji and Unicode

Will a fixed emoji set suffice?

Some SoftBank 1999 color emoji

SoftBank is a Japanese cell phone carrier, the original inventors of emoji. This is from their 1999 set, the first set that had color (and animations). Image from Emojipedia

Emoji and culture

Reducing undesirable signification

Representing more cultures

Example: Kiss

Presented without comment

From The Unicode Emoji technical standard:

Gas pump